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Fat Sheep. Golodnaia Steppe

1905
Located to the southeast of the Kyzyl Kum Desert, Golodnaia Steppe (“Hungry Steppe”) is composed of the loess variety of soil suitable for growing grass and small shrubs in semi-arid conditions. The region, some 10,000 square kilometers in size, has a harsh continental climate: cold in the winter and extremely hot in the summer. Shown at this steppe farmstead are fat-tailed sheep, which adapted well to the local conditions and were a source of meat as well as wool. The shepherd is protected against the winter cold by a fur-trimmed coat. The curved walls in the foreground are of adobe brick. The image is by Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944), who used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire in the early 20th century. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire. In 1911 he made two trips to an area of Central Asia then known as Turkestan (present-day Uzbekistan and neighboring states), where he photographed traditional culture as well as the results of Russian development. In the newly acquired region of Turkestan the Russians created an area for raising cotton, wheat, and livestock in the Golodnaia Steppe by diverting water from the Syr-Darya River.

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acku Afghanistan
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1905<br />
Located to the southeast of the Kyzyl Kum Desert, Golodnaia Steppe (“Hungry Steppe”) is composed of the loess variety of soil suitable for growing grass and small shrubs in semi-arid conditions. The region, some 10,000 square kilometers in size, has a harsh continental climate: cold in the winter and extremely hot in the summer. Shown at this steppe farmstead are fat-tailed sheep, which adapted well to the local conditions and were a source of meat as well as wool. The shepherd is protected against the winter cold by a fur-trimmed coat. The curved walls in the foreground are of adobe brick. The image is by Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863–1944), who used a special color photography process to create a visual record of the Russian Empire in the early 20th century. Some of Prokudin-Gorskii’s photographs date from about 1905, but the bulk of his work is from between 1909 and 1915, when, with the support of Tsar Nicholas II and the Ministry of Transportation, he undertook extended trips through many different parts of the empire. In 1911 he made two trips to an area of Central Asia then known as Turkestan (present-day Uzbekistan and neighboring states), where he photographed traditional culture as well as the results of Russian development. In the newly acquired region of Turkestan the Russians created an area for raising cotton, wheat, and livestock in the Golodnaia Steppe by diverting water from the Syr-Darya River.